The Elephants

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Elephant Parade London has now ended but we’d like to say a HUGE thank you to everyone who contributed to its success – find out who they are here

The elephants are back! 30 brightly painted elephant sculptures are standing sentinel across London – raising awareness and funds for their endangered wild cousins.

The herd can be found in Mayfair and Chelsea until 18th July and are available to bid for online on our og_imagepage.

To help you track the trunks we have live map… happy ele spotting.

MARWAR MATANG by HIS HIGHNESS MAHARAJA GAJ SINGH II OF JODHPUR, MARWAR

Marwar Matang

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: The painted elephant is inspired by Marwar Miniatures specifically from the Shiv Puran Series painted under the patronage of Maharaja Man Singh of Jodhpur.

Bio: H. Maharaja Gaj Singh II (b. 1948) has provided dynamic leadership in several sectors for the state of Rajasthan. The Maharaja’s major thrust has been in tourism, which has emerged the life-line of modern-day Marwar, and Rajasthan. In addition to the conversion of his own palaces into hotels, foremost among them the Umaid Bhawan, one of the great palace hotels in the world, and the Mehrangarh Fort into an internationally acclaimed museum, the Maharaja has led the innovative Heritage Hotel movement, the future of tourism in Rajasthan. The Maharaja is currently on the Governing Council of the Indian National Trust for Art & Cultural Heritage (INTACH). He is also the State Convenor for the Rajasthan State Chapter and Patron of The Elephant Family.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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TARA ASTAMANGALA by GOOD EARTH

Tara Astamangala

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: This elephant by Good Earth is ‘Tara Astamangala’. It features a Good Earth design interpretation of the “eight auspicious symbols”, known as the astamangala – they represent the offerings that Vedic gods presented to Sakyamuni Buddha upon his enlightenment. We have depicted the eight as a composite crest as they are often portrayed in the Buddhist tradition.

Bio: Good Earth is India’s leading design house, which celebrates the heritage of India and Asia through unique design stories with a focus on craft traditions. Established in 1996 with its first boutique at Kemps Corner, Mumbai, Good Earth has set standards for stylish luxury retail across India. Today the brand celebrates 21 years of a design aesthetic that is crafted by hand, inspired by nature and enchanted by history. The last two decades have seen Good Earth grow into a cult brand recognised for its crafts-focused approach to luxury design and commitment to reviving the authentic skills of India’s craft communities.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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SIKANDER BAGH by PAYAL SINGHAL

Sikander Bagh

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: I named my elephant after a garden located in the city of Lucknow, India. It was built by the last Nawab of Oudh as a summer residence. The name of the villa signifies “Garden of Sikandar”, perhaps after Alexander the Great. The elephant is strong and definitive symbolised by the black background and the contemporary chintz floral pattern signifies the softer gentler side of elephants. It is also a symbol of what India has had to offer the world of design for centuries. The chintz pattern originated in India and gained popularity in Europe in the 17th century.

Bio: Payal Singhal is a leading South Asian fashion house established in 1999. Singhal designs for the quality and design conscious who value and appreciate the art of fashion. The ‘Payal Singhal’ signature look is contemporary Indian clothing and translates effortlessly from Indian to Global. Born in Mumbai, Payal produced her first award-winning couture look at the age of 15. After completing her design degree at SNDT, Mumbai and The Parsons School of Design and F.I.T, New York Payal launched her label with a flagship store in Mumbai. Singhal’s line is available at http://www.payalsinghal.com, retail and online stores across the world.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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AHMEDABAD by SONAL AMBANI

March of Times

Location: Brown Hart Gardens

Inspiration: The clocks that engulf the elephant represent the flow of time, from birth until death. The stroke of each minute gives light to new possibilities and nevertheless brings limits to our existence. It is with the grace of time that all creatures procreate and coexist. We must act now to inspire the youth, for time inevitably churns the cogs of change, but the direction is up to us.

Bio: Sculptor Sonal Ambani began her creative journey two decades ago, sculpting across various mediums and styles. Her work bridges the gap between nature and urbanisation, seeking to create a delicate bond between these two diverse ecosystems. Each piece is adorned with her symbolic peace sign, a theme that is at the core of her work. Sonal sculpts with the intention of challenging the viewer to create his/her own meaning by reflecting upon their own life experiences. She believes that art needs to find that balance between visual elegance and intrinsic contemplation. Her sculptures have been shown at Jehangir Art Gallery in Mumbai and Art Bahrain Across Borders (Art BAB, March 2017) and are also a part of the personal collection of her Royal Highness Princess Sabeeka Bint Ibhrahim Al Khalifa, wife of the King of Bahrain and other members of the Royal Family.

Materials used: Metal.

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RAMRATTAN by RAVI VAZIRANI

Ramrattan

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: Since the time we opened the doors of our studio, we have worked extensively with concrete, experimenting with its various moods and textures. We have continuously been inspired by the simplicity, versatility and aesthetic of the material. So it is only natural that the unswerving, trusty concrete was also a part of our inspiration for this project. We envision the elephant with a marbled concrete look; making it the focal and talking point in the space it inhabits.

Bio: Ravi Vazirani Design Studio is a boutique studio catering to a clientele that values aesthetics, practicality and a dash of je ne sais quoi. Design is an intrinsic part of Ravi’s daily life and he finds inspiration from everything he encounters, be it his immediate surroundings or his travels around the world.

Materials used: Acrylic paint in marble finish.

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DAHLIA by ANUSHKA KHANNA

Dahlia

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: “When I was asked to design for this project, I immediately thought of Diane Vreeland’s famous quote – “Pink is the navy blue of India.” In our country, colour is celebrated and using that as a starting point, I knew I wanted to go with a beautiful blush pink. No other colour seemed more apt to demonstrate the strength and power of this majestic animal. My strength as a designer lies in my surface embellishments which use traditional Indian techniques in a contemporary language. The overall effect is one of lightness. The elephant is known to be one of the largest animals in the jungle, but they also have such a fragility and delicacy to their being and it’s that characteristic that I aimed to capture.”

Bio: Mumbai-based designer Anushka Khanna has established her label both in India and abroad. Khanna’s aesthetic is a meeting of her Indian heritage with a global perspective. Her line focuses on two distinct categories; Indian wear and Western wear. Known for her love of colour and her use of intricate and fine embroidery. Khanna’s look is young, vibrant and fresh. Her work has been featured in publications such as US Instyle, Vogue, L’Officiel, Savvy, DNA, After Hours and Bombay Times to name a few.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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ME AND MY MILLION VOICES by VEER MUNSHI

Me and My Million Voices

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: The elephant is considered the architect of the jungle who facilitates the impossible in the forest and around. The elephant takes pride in carrying the animal world. He shares the responsibility of others too who are also endangered – deer, leopard, tiger, bear and so on and so forth. My design represents the burden of uncertainties shown by millions of tiny animals and birds on a giant elephant in its miniature format.

Bio: Veer Munshi was born in Kashmir and studied fine arts at M.S.University Baroda. He lives and practices in Delhi and has seventeen solo shows to his credit in Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Perth, Edinburgh and Geneva – through his varied medium of expressions.

Materials used: Acrylic paint, fibreglass pigeon on head and varnish.

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KAMAL KUNJI by ATELIER OF PICHVAI TRADITION & BEYOND

Kamal KunjLocation: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: The Kamalan ki Pichvai with the lotus motifs are used during the summer months to create a cool and genteel atmosphere in the sanctum of the temple of Srinathji. Elephants are known for their love of water and rivers which is where lotuses thrive.

Bio: Pichvai Tradition and beyond is an initiative to revive and preserve this historical art form, and extend patronage to the local artist of Rajasthan. Founded by Pooja Singhal who nurture miniature artist from Rajasthan, who have overtime worked towards adapting traditional Pichvai compositions into more intricate patterns derived from other miniature practices.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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GULAB by PRABHAKAR PACHPUTE & RUPALI PATIL

Gulab

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: We are trying to revisit the story of the four harmonious friends. An elephant standing under a fruit tree carrying a monkey, a hare and a bird on top of each other. The scene refers to a legend, which tells that four animals were trying to find out who was the oldest. The elephant said that the tree was already fully grown when he was young, the monkey said that the tree was small when he was young, the hare said that he saw the tree as a sapling when he was young and the bird claimed that he had excreted the seed from which the tree grew. So the bird was recognised by the other animals as the oldest, and the four animals lived together in co-dependence and cooperation, helping each other to enjoy the fruits of the tree.

Bio: Prabhakar is an artist and author of drawings and installations. In his works, he constantly returns to the subject of working conditions in mines and the cultural values of the mining industry in his home state of Maharashtra. Rupali creates graphics, artistic objects, and installations. She usually collaborates with Prabhakar, creating site-specific installations that tackle the themes of agrarian cultures and global social problems.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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ARANYA by SUHASINI KEJRIWAL

Aranya

Location: Carlos Place

Inspiration: Studies suggest that the worrying depletion in the Asian elephant’s population is largely because of the disappearance of their habitat. My design reflects this idea. The foliage on the body suggests a forest and wherever there is no forest, the skeleton of the elephant is visible suggesting extinction.

Bio: Kaleidoscopic and bordering on the psychedelic, Kejriwal’s paintings revel in minutiae, overflow with information, and convey multiple viewpoints simultaneously. Her technique synthesises the disciplines of painting, drawing, photography and collage into a cohesive whole. The artist lavishes her attentions on the surfaces of objects, articulating the differences of materials and replicating the infinite varieties to be found in both the natural and man-made worlds.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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RIDESH by GAYATRI SEKHRI

Ridesh

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: The vision for this piece was to blend nature’s beauty with this sculpture, in order to enhance its own aesthetic qualities as well the visual surroundings. I use bronze, aluminium, fibreglass and other alloys to make these pieces.

Bio: Having finished her schooling from the Convent of Jesus and Mary, New Delhi, Gayatri went on to study law at Durham University, England. Later, she worked as an advocate in New Delhi and Singapore for three years. But it wasn’t long after that she had a creative epiphany and was drawn to the aesthetics. Her job seemed mundane and she decided to follow her dream to become an artist.

Materials used: Metal washers.

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BLUE DIMENSION by JASON WOODSIDE

blue dimension

Location: Brown Hart Gardens

Inspiration: The elephant features recognizably vivid and optimistic colours, combined with the contrasting layers of geometric patterns. The large swirls of colours and intricate patterns carry the viewer into the different, more lively and more enthusiastic state of mind.

Bio: Jason Woodside is a prolific artist whose paintings and murals can be found throughout New York City, Los Angeles, Sydney, and Paris. His work is based on bold geometric shapes, vibrant and hypnotizing patterns as well as striking colour combinations. Woodside finds the inspiration for his art in textiles and clothings and he has transformed some of his pieces into outfits during the collaboration with the most prestigious fashion brands such as Adidas and OBEY. Woodside is also known as one of the key personalities belonging to the post-graffiti movement.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish

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ELE-NOUVEAU DEUX by VARUN BAHL

Inspiration: The elephant is an ode to the Art Nouveau period of decorative art and ornamental living that features in the design. The design exemplifies a myriad of art elements and the magnificent jewellery motifs that Varun has recently found inspiration in for his garments. The intricate curvilinear patterns with floral and plant-inspired motifs encourage the organic forms and patterns of that period to flow from one object to another. The Asiatic elephant is an elegant and beautiful animal and is celebrated in Indian culture in many ways. So, to bring out its gentle beauty we decorated it with patterns and motifs that define an era of elegance and opulent beauty.

Bio: A graduate of the National Institute of Fashion Technology, New Delhi, Varun launched his eponymous label in 2001. His work marries the beauty of heritage Indian handcrafted embroideries with a modern colour sensibility. His clothes range from traditional saris and lehenga ensembles to contemporary separates like trousers, tunics, jackets and dresses. He is known for the lightness of his fabrics and not overloading them with heavy embellishments.

Materials used: Acrylic paints and varnish

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BABY DOLL by ADIL AHMAD and KANIKA KAPOOR

Location: South Molton Street

Inspiration: A perfect artistic partnership was formed when Adil Ahmad and Kanika Kapoor teamed up to create Baby Doll. Mr Ahmad said: “Baby Doll is inspired by the indigenous Chikankari handiwork from lko which is our native town that’s why I collaborated with Kanika to create this unique work of art.” Chikankari is the creation of a piece of embroidery in the Chikan style – an extremely delicate hand technique originating from the 3rd Century BC. Baby Doll’s delicate design represents the delicate nature of our planet and the threads which connect every species together.

Kanika Kapoor Bio: Kanika Kapoor began her Bollywood singing career with the song Baby Doll for the film Ragini MMS 2. Baby Doll went viral and topped the charts and Kapoor received wide critical acclaim and several accolades for her singing style, including the Filmfare Award for Best Female Playback Singer in 2014. Kapoor quickly earned huge success for singing Hindi cinema’s top charted songs and received rave reviews for her live performances all over the globe, including for India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi at London’s Wembley in 2015.

Adil Ahmad Bio: Adil Iqbal Ahmad completed his first commissioned interior design project when he was sixteen. His journey in the pursuit of excellence continues. Creative design, with its diverse attributes all intrinsic to a larger idea, woven into a complex project, and embellished with a seamless overlay of the many different elements that celebrate the core idea, invokes the artist in him. Adil has an unerring eye for precision, detail and symmetry and an unrelenting demand for perfection.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and rhinestones

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BAR PALLADIO ELEPHANT by MARIE-ANNE OUDEJANS

Location: The Beaumont Hotel

Inspiration: The inspiration comes from the Bar Palladio Jaipur that I designed. It was commissioned by Barbara Miolini in the property of Narain Niwas Palace Hotel in 2013 in Jaipur. I was inspired by traditional Indian heritage and the beauty of India mixed with a European touch.

Bio: Marie-Anne is Founder and Fashion designer of the New York-based brand ‘TOCCA’ in the nineties, winner of the CFDA, Perry Ellis Award in 1995 and a consultant for international fashion brands.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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TARA FOR MARK by ELEPHANT FAMILY

Location: The Beaumont Hotel

Inspiration: In 1988, Mark Shand, the late and very great adventurer, rescued a street-begging elephant named Tara, who changed his life forever. Together they travelled 800 kilometres across India and Tara became the star of Mark’s bestselling book, Travels on my Elephant. When Mark returned home to te UK, he founded Elephant Family to protect Tara’s endangered wild cousins and dedicated the rest of his life to the cause.

Our Tara for Mark elephant is decorated with the passage from Travels on my Elephant in which Mark describes his feelings upon first laying eyes on Tara and falling head over heels in love.

Materials used: Acrylic paints and varnish

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TRAMP OF MARCHING FEET by GEORGE MARTIN

Location: The Beaumont Hotel

Inspiration: “I capture urban environment with a twist. My work explores patterns in the natural and built world. The images are a semi-abstract piece of a greater whole, often made complex through single and multiple reflections.”

Bio: The first recipient of Art India Magazine’s Promising Artist Award in 2005, George Martin PJ was born in Kerala in 1973. His works are a spectral of luscious colour, painting a magical view of the world around us, which appears to be spinning at a dizzying speed. There are no limitations to colour or form in Martin’s visual extravaganza, in a single canvas he is able to merge multiple cultures. However, when viewed more carefully, Martin’s densely populated compositions resonate the transitory and disunited true nature of our world.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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MONSOON MAGIC by MICHELLE POONAWALLA

Location: Grosvenor Square

Inspiration: “The elephant is often looked upon as a symbol of prosperity. Here, an elephants ability to carry water in its trunk is personified by clouds that bring rain and much needed water for crops to flourish. Especially in India the monsoon is extremely important for our farmers’ crops. The elephant is covered in a painting of luscious clouds which is revealed under the surface.”

Bio: Michelle Poonawalla graduated with a degree in Interior Design and has always had art in her blood. She is the grand-daughter of the famed south Mumbai architect, Jehangir Vazifdar, who was well known for his buildings as well his art.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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PHULA by MARISSA BRIDGE

Location: Brown Hart Gardens

Inspiration: “The name of my ele is Phula, which is Hindi for ‘flower’. The design for Phula came from my imagining an elephant crying over the loss of its native habitat.As it cries, its tears fall onto the grassland, and water the flowers of hope and love that grow and blossom all over it. My wish is that Phula spreads a positive message to all who see it, and that people will be inspired to save the majestic elephants and their habitats in every country, and let them live in peace forever onwards.”

Bio: Marissa Bridge is an artist whose work has always been inspired by nature, as a study in spirit, form, and pattern. She works in series, as a method of investigation and as a meditative process. In addition to painting in oil and acrylic, she creates 3-D mixed media pieces out of recycled paper and other repurposed materials such as nails, beads, seeds and stones. Her current work explores the theme of the circle and the eternal rebirth of nature. In addition, she is studying what it means to be a centered individual, and the connections between and among individuals in large groups.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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 BABAR TRAVELS TO LONDON by ADIL AHMAD

Location: Sloane Square

Inspiration: The Indian elephant is rooted in art, ritual and tradition and it is revered in this country. Tara, the elephant Mark Shand made his own, symbolized that very versatility. Elephants were prominent in miniature paintings deftly crafted in the famed ateliers of the Mughal and Rajput courts. The skill of that art has been passed down generations and is alive even today. My elephant salutes that very fabled celebration of the Indian elephant through art and painting in a contemporary idiom though still drawing from the fine artisanal skills we still have in India today.

Bio: Adil Iqbal Ahmad completed his first commissioned interior design project when he was sixteen. His journey in the pursuit of excellence continues. Creative design, with its diverse attributes all intrinsic to a larger idea, woven into a complex project, and embellished with a seamless overlay of the many different elements that celebrate the core idea, invokes the artist in him. Adil has an unerring eye for precision, detail and symmetry and an unrelenting demand for perfection.

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STOP! by LITTLE SHILPA

Inspiration: “To say STOP to something, anything these days has no power, more often so, especially if said using force. It’s assertive against aggressive! STOP on my elephant is indicated through the usage of plastic Mehndi(henna) stencils to pass on a message albeit a plea to #helpthehathi, but done so not as a red signal palm but a thought-provoking representation thus influencing through beauty rather than intimidation.”

The saris reiterate the idea of sustainability, rethink and reuse of available resources and raw materials juxtaposed with plexi thus marrying heritage with technology.

Bio: As a lover of science and “l’amour” Little Shilpa’s work is a culmination of visual diaspora, where concepts and influences range from travel, memories and a need for pushing the boundary. The brand draws inspiration from local influences and observations, where pieces in every collection use varied raw materials, fusing ideas collected through multi-cultural interaction.

Materials used: Plastic Mehndi, acrylic paint and varnish, vintage brocade sari cut-outs embedded in plexi.

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GAIA by RAFAELA DE ASCANIO

Location: South Molton Street

Inspiration: “The women depicted on this elephant are worshipping nature. One priestess clasps a candle in prayer, while another holds up a pot in a moon ritual. On either side, warriors put down their arms in submission to the power of Gaia. Each scene is held up by trees representing their vital part in our planet’s ecosystem.”

Bio: Rafaela de Ascanio is a painter, performance artist and ceramicist. She studied Fine Art at Central Saint Martin’s and an MA in Art History at the Courtauld Institute of Art. She has performed at Tate Modern and Peckham Festival and exhibited her first solo show ‘Duende’ in Hackney in 2018. Her paintings and ceramics playfully reimagine art historical tropes such as renaissance tarot cards and saintly relics as deifications of female warriors, witches and performers. Appropriating the reverence of altarpieces and Christian stories, she creates polyptychs using contemporary subjects, exploring how these ancient narratives run troublingly against her interest in queer and feminist culture.

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GIVING BACK PRIDE WITHOUT PREJUDICE by ADIL AHMAD, VASUNDHARA RAJE and PRISONERS of the CENTRAL JAILof JAIPUR

Location: Sloane Square

Inspiration: “In Rajasthan, rigorous imprisonment in the jails ranges from being taught furniture making, to the weaving of rugs and also, learning how to paint. The Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Vasundhra Raje, commissioned painters who are prisoners, some inmates awaiting trial and sentenced convicts, all lodged at the Central Jail in Jaipur, to embellish this elephant. It is a story of transformation. It is restoring a sense of Pride without Prejudice.”

Bio: Adil Iqbal Ahmad completed his first commissioned interior design project when he was sixteen. His journey in the pursuit of excellence continues. Creative design, with its diverse attributes all intrinsic to a larger idea, woven into a complex project, and embellished with a seamless overlay of the many different elements that celebrate the core idea, invokes the artist in him. Adil has an unerring eye for precision, detail and symmetry and an unrelenting demand for perfection.

Materials used: Acrylic paint and varnish.

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INFINITY by GAURAV GUPTA

Location: R Chocolate, Ebury Street

Inspiration: “The elephant is our largest land mammal and perhaps the most mystical, ancient being that lives amongst us. It is deeply disturbing that this warm, friendly creature is now endangered in our ecosystem.

To raise awareness for this alarming cause, we have put together this beautiful creation. The inspiration behind our design for this elephant is simply a spirit of infinity and eternity – the same characteristic which epitomizes our brand aesthetic as well, and that is what we have tried to capture. Making timeless creations that live on. The technique used on the elephant is a very indigenous method of the brand, called the boning technique, with a flow and rhythm to it. Hence the name ‘Infinity’ for our Elephant.

We also want to celebrate the essence of India – hence the bright red. The red also signifies the urgency of the situation to save this spiritual animal. We are trying to make a statement, a call of fear and desperation, but at the same time also celebrating the soul of India and our roots – thus imprinting this project with our signature and our core sensibility. In India the elephant is very auspicious – we start everything with Lord Ganesha and decorate & worship it. There is an emotional value that connects us to it. It represents wisdom. This is the message we want to transfer through our elephant and emphasize that the world needs to wake up to what we are doing to the ecological cycle, and what we should really be doing instead.

The sculptural construction, the colour red and the reverence for the elephant in India – it all comes together in an infinite way with this creation. These elements together inspired the mood and feeling of this fantastical sculpture.”

Bio: One of the most celebrated and progressive couturiers in India and a global name on the rise. The man and the brand have carved a world that is future primitive, reflected through sculpture-like garments with a sense of infinity and rhythm. Merging indigenous Indian construction and embellishing techniques with his idea of the future, delivering and sustaining a world that is Indian at its core and boundless in its form.

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KALI 2.0: DIVINITY REVISITED by ABU JANI and SANDEEP KHOLSA

Location: Sloane Square

Inspiration: “The Kaleidoscope moves away from multiple colours and now embraces the bold. Gold, Black and Red mirror is used to create an aura of stark strength and absolute power.

KALI 2.0 is an unapologetic expression of Shakti or the Female Divine. An ode to the magnificent spirit and strength of woman.”

Bio: The Abu Jani Sandeep Khosla fashion label holds an unparalleled position in the world of Indian Haute Couture. The richness of India’s heritage, suffused with cutting-edge design makes every garment a modern masterpiece. Abu and Sandeep have established themselves as pioneers in resurrecting the best of the past and fashioning it for the future.

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KASHMIR KI KALI by JJ VALAYA

Location: Sloane Square

Inspiration: “Inspired by the JAMAVARs of Kashmir, our elephant is indeed special. She has a unicorn’s horn on her as a symbolic plea to the world that if she is not looked after, she will become a myth, much sought after but never seen. She is covered in an age old craft from Kashmir, Jamavar, which has been interpreted in its original multicolored avatar as well in an elegant gold version. Hand painted and then accentuated using multiple materials and techniques, she also carries the Valaya signature “shifting leaves” chevron pattern as well as an assortment of hearts painted by children of different ages showing the importance of the elephants and their habitat.”

Bio: JJ Valaya is a part of the pioneering group of Indian fashion designers and is one of the first who initiated the concept of modern fashion in India. He is a founding member on the Board of Governors of the Fashion Design Council of India (FDCI), and was the first official brand ambassador for Crystal giant, Swarovski in India. The House of Valaya was founded in 1992 with the launch of its couture label, JJ Valaya by brothers TJ Singh and JJ Valaya. The brand’s lines today encompass Haute Couture, Bridal, Occasion Wear, Bridge, Ready-to-wear, Home and Luxury design services.

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CASTELLUM by MICHAEL HOWELLS

Location: Sloane Square

Inspiration: ‘Castellum’ means ‘a sense of safeguard’ in Latin. Pallas protected Troy from the Greeks, ‘palladium’ from the Ancient Greek. The elephant is covered in entirely in Palladium.

Bio: A production designer working both in film and in fashion, Michael Howells is credited with realising some of the most spectacular and ambitious sets in either field. Closely aligned with many of the highest-profile practitioners in fashion, Howells has designed numerous sets for John Galliano’s Christian Dior and eponymous fashion shows; Howells has also realised catwalk presentations for Christian Lacroix and Alexander McQueen.

Materials used: Palladium

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SAVRITI by VIKRAM GOYAL

Location: Sloane Square

Inspiration:  “Conceived and perfected over the course of the last 18 months, this intricate jaali/lattice work entirely in brass, in the Brutalist style, draws on centuries-old methods once patronized by royal families – underscoring a commitment to exquisite Indian craftsmanship. The sculpture features irregular empty spaces which signify the fragmented landscapes in which India’s endangered elephants exist. The cage-like metal work is a metaphor for the elephant, trapped by the urbanization of its environment, and the wildlife corridors on which their future depends. Savitri, the daughter of Savitr, a Hindu sun god, means “ray of light” in Sanskrit – suggesting hope for the Indian elephants and also reflective of the fingers of light that permeate through the jaali.”

Bio: Vikram Goyal is known for creating unique, modern, dramatic masterpieces that blur the lines between design, furniture and art. He is the co-founder of product and interior design firm Viya Home along with Kama Ayurveda. Goyal’s sensibility when designing homes tends towards creating extremely refined spaces that evoke India through the language of its craftsmanship, rather than the language of its design. His homes display eclecticism, with a mix of periods and styles. Vikram Goyal is also a Patron of Elephant Family and has been instrumental in building support, both artistically and philanthropically, for Elephant Parade India and the work of Elephant Family.

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SHEESH MAHAL by ROHIT BAL

Location: South Molton Street

Inspiration: “Sheesh Mahal from the House of Bal is a testament to his love affair with the ever so glorious craft of ‘Thikri’ – mirror work, which has lived on from the era of the Mughals (used in the interiors of the Royal Courts of Rajasthan and Delhi). Every single one of these tiny convex mirrors has been drawn, cut and arranged by hand for over 300 hours. A true labour of love, Sheesh Mahal stands as a symbol of Bal’s poetic love for India’s boundless rich heritage.”

Bio: Rohit Bal is intensely concerned with design as an art form. The designer draws on history, fantasy and folklore to create masterpieces that are desired by discerning aficionados around the globe. Rohit has a deep understanding of the psyche of the fashion world and it reflects in his collections that are intelligent, studied, imaginative and completely innovative, yet always relevant and awe-inspiring. Rohit draws from influences, wide and varied – from the village crafts and traditional methods of design that India is so rich in, to the transient phenomenon of the subcontinent’s urban landscape. The designer brings them all to life in his spectacular yet original language.

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About Elephant Parade

The elephants in the 2018 Concours d’elephant come from the global social enterprise Elephant Parade®.

Elephant Parade® is a social enterprise and runs the world’s largest art exhibition of decorated elephant statues. Created by artists and celebrities, each Elephant Parade statue is a unique art piece. Since launching in 2007, Elephant Parade has visited dozens of cities around the world including: Hong Kong, London, Milan, Bangkok, Sao Paolo, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Luxembourg, Dana Point California, Singapore. In 2013, Elephant Parade did its first ever country tour, visiting 14 UK cities over 12 months.

Limited edition, handcrafted replicas and a select range of products are created from the exhibition elephants. 20% of Elephant Parade net profits are donated to elephant welfare and conservation projects. Website: www.elephantparade.comEP Logo

100% from the sale of the London Parade 2018 exhibition elephants helps support the work of Elephant Family